Singular Computing vs Google: A landmark case for AI patent infringement

computing vs Google AI A federal jury in Boston will decide whether Google infringed two patents owned by Singular Computing, a company founded by computer scientist Joseph Bates, who claims that Google copied his technology to power artificial intelligence features in its products. Singular Computing vs Google AI patent case computing vs Google AI

The trial, which began on Tuesday, is expected to last two to three weeks and could result in a multibillion-dollar verdict against Google, as Singular is seeking up to $7 billion in damages, according to a court filing. This would be more than double the largest-ever patent infringement award in US history.

Singular’s lawsuit, filed in 2019, alleges that Bates shared his computer-processing innovations with Google between 2010 and 2014, hoping to collaborate with the tech giant. However, Google rejected his idea and later introduced its own processors, called Tensor Processing Units (TPUs), which enhance Google’s AI capabilities and are used for speech recognition, content generation, ad recommendation and other functions.

Singular claims that Google’s TPUs copy Bates’ technology and infringe two patents that cover an improved architecture that allows for greater processing power and has “revolutionized the way AI training and inference are accomplished. Singular Computing vs Google AI patent case

Google denies the allegations and argues that its processors work in different ways than Singular’s patented technology and that the patents are invalid. Google also contends that it developed its processors “independently over many years” and that Bates’ technology was not suitable for the type of applications Google was developing.

Google spokesperson Jose Castaneda called Singular’s patents “dubious” and said that “we look forward to setting the record straight in court.”

An attorney for Singular declined to comment on the case. Singular Computing vs Google AI patent case

The trial comes as Google faces increasing scrutiny over its dominance in the AI field and its impact on privacy, competition and society. Google is also involved in another patent dispute with Sonos, a maker of smart speakers, over wireless audio technology.

Singular Computing vs Google: A landmark case for AI patent infringement. Learn how Google allegedly copied a computer scientist’s patents to power its AI processors and what this means for the AI industry.

The outcome of the trial could have significant implications for the AI industry, as it could affect the ownership and licensing of key technologies that are essential for developing and deploying AI systems.

Google is facing a multibillion-dollar lawsuit over its use of artificial intelligence technology in its products and services. The plaintiff, Singular Computing, claims that Google infringed two patents owned by its founder, Joseph Bates, a computer scientist who invented a novel way of processing data for AI applications.

The trial, which started on Tuesday in a federal court in Boston, is expected to last for two to three weeks and could result in a record-breaking verdict against Google, as Singular is seeking up to $7 billion in damages123. This would be more than double the largest-ever patent infringement award in US history, which was $2.5 billion in a case involving Intel and VLSI Technology4. computing vs Google AI

Singular’s lawsuit, filed in 2019, alleges that Bates shared his computer-processing innovations with Google between 2010 and 2014, hoping to collaborate with the tech giant. However, Google rejected his idea and later introduced its own processors, called Tensor Processing Units (TPUs), which enhance Google’s AI capabilities and are used for speech recognition, content generation, ad recommendation and other functions123.

Singular claims that Google’s TPUs copy Bates’ technology and infringe two patents that cover an improved architecture that allows for greater processing power and has “revolutionized the way AI training and inference are accomplished”123.

Google denies the allegations and argues that its processors work in different ways than Singular’s patented technology and that the patents are invalid. Google also contends that it developed its processors “independently over many years” and that Bates’ technology was not suitable for the type of applications Google was developing123.

Google spokesperson Jose Castaneda called Singular’s patents “dubious” and said that “we look forward to setting the record straight in court”123.

An attorney for Singular declined to comment on the case.

The trial comes as Google faces increasing scrutiny over its dominance in the AI field and its impact on privacy, competition and society. Google is also involved in another patent dispute with Sonos, a maker of smart speakers, over wireless audio technology5.

The outcome of the trial could have significant implications for the AI industry, as it could affect the ownership and licensing of key technologies that are essential for developing and deploying AI systems.

6 thoughts on “Singular Computing vs Google: A landmark case for AI patent infringement”

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