AI Labeling and Regulation: Australia’s Response

Artificial intelligence (AI) is becoming more prevalent in our daily lives, but many Australians are not comfortable with how it is used and developed. A recent survey by the University of Queensland and KPMG found that Australians have low trust in AI systems and want them to be better regulated. AI labeling and regulation in Australia

The survey, which involved more than 2,500 respondents, revealed that nearly half of Australians are unwilling to share their information or data with an AI system, and two in five are unwilling to rely on the recommendations or output of an AI system. Moreover, most Australians do not believe that AI systems are designed with integrity and humanity, and that commercial organisations use AI for financial gain rather than societal benefit.

In response to these concerns, the federal government has released an interim report on Safe and Responsible AI in Australia, which outlines its vision and actions for fostering trust in AI. The report acknowledges the potential economic and social benefits of AI, but also the risks and challenges that need to be addressed.The survey, which involved more than 2,500 respondents, revealed that nearly half of Australians are unwilling to share their information or data with an AI system, and two in five are unwilling to rely on the recommendations or output of an AI system. Moreover, most Australians do not believe that AI systems are designed with integrity and humanity, and that commercial organisations use AI for financial gain rather than societal benefit.

One of the key actions proposed by the government is to develop a voluntary AI Safety Standard, which will provide guidance and best practices for businesses that want to integrate AI into their systems. The standard will cover aspects such as data quality, privacy, security, transparency, accountability, and human oversight.

Another action is to consult with industry on the merits of introducing watermarks or labels for AI-generated content, such as text, images, or videos. This would help users to distinguish between human and machine-generated content, and to make informed decisions about how to use or share it.

The government also plans to establish an expert advisory group on AI policy, which will advise on the development and implementation of further measures to ensure the safe and responsible use of AI. These measures may include mandatory safeguards for high-risk AI applications, such as pre-deployment testing, training standards, and liability frameworks.

The government’s report is an interim response to a consultation process that began in 2019, and is expected to be followed by a final response later this year. The report also aligns with the recommendations of the Australian Human Rights Commission, which released a report on Human Rights and Technology in 2020, calling for a national strategy on AI and human rights.

The government’s report states that its goal is to “build a culture of trust in AI in Australia, where AI is used for good, and where Australians have confidence that AI systems are safe, secure, reliable and fair”. However, achieving this goal will require ongoing collaboration and engagement with various stakeholders, including the public, the private sector, the research community, and civil society.

How Australia is addressing the low public trust in AI by introducing measures such as labeling and regulation. Learn more about the government’s report and vision for safe and responsible AI.

In response to these concerns, the federal government has released an interim report on Safe and Responsible AI in Australia, which outlines its vision and actions for fostering trust in AI. The report acknowledges the potential economic and social benefits of AI, but also the risks and challenges that need to be addressed.The survey, which involved more than 2,500 respondents, revealed that nearly half of Australians are unwilling to share their information or data with an AI system, and two in five are unwilling to rely on the recommendations or output of an AI system. Moreover, most Australians do not believe that AI systems are designed with integrity and humanity, and that commercial organizations use AI for financial gain rather than societal benefit.

1 thought on “AI Labeling and Regulation: Australia’s Response”

Leave a Comment